Musem Store P2  - Local Historians and Authors 

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How to Order

 

You can place an order by emailing us at MillinocketHistSoc@gmail.com, calling us at (207)723-5477,  or by sending a Facebook message. We now accept Paypal and credit cards.

All items may be mailed - add $6 shipping and handling for each item.

The museum store is open Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, from 12 to 3 PM.
 

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West of Chesuncook & North of Moosehead: Log Drives & Sporting Camps, 1830-1971

$30

By Bill Geller

Maine historian/researcher/author Bill Geller is the authority of the history of the woods and waters around Millinocket. 

 

2nd in series on West Branch logging days/sporting camps

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Maine Sporting Camp History

$25

By Bill Geller

Maine historian/researcher/author Bill Geller is the authority of the history of the woods and waters around Millinocket. 

3rd in series on West Branch logging days/sporting camps from this very popular author. 

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Within Katahdin's Realm

$30
By Bill Geller

Maine historian/researcher/author Bill Geller is the authority of the history of the woods and waters around Millinocket. 

A detailed historical journey along the West Branch of the Penobscot River and its tributaries, with great stories about the logging operations and the sporting camps.

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The Northern Magazine, digitized

$50   The complete set, a decade of interesting reading

From 1921 to 1928 the Spruce Wood Department of Great Northern Paper Company published a monthly magazine full of news and stories about the company designed to connect the laborers and the executives. Every issue is a gem that makes for wonderful reading or research.  All issues are included. 

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Logging Towboats and Boom Jumpers

$20

by Roger Allen Moody

NEW!!

O. A. Harkness helped Great Northern Paper Company become the largest paper mill in the world. He built 'an inland navy' designed to move logs to the mill. He also operated an innovative logging tramway, a fleet of Lombard log haulers, and a landlocked wilderness railroad to move logs from the Saint John watershed to the Penobscot. The ghost train locomotives still remain in the woods.

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